The above cathedral shots are from a personal project. I started to get really interested in photogrammetry and decided to use St. James cathedral in Seattle as a study for developing some photogrammetry techniques. I shot a few thousand pictures of the inside of the church, and matched them together using Photomodeler, and made basic reference markers to model from. At the time there was no Maya export in Photomodeler, so I wrote a MEL script that would export all cameras and locators over to Maya. I then started modeling the cathedral based off the imported data and photographs. Modeled using polygons, NURBS and smooth-proxy. The wireframe shot shows the model over a photograph.

The magazine Cadalyst (a magazine for CAD/design professionals) wrote an article about this work, and other work that my wife and I did using photogrammetry. You can view that article here: http://www.cadalyst.com/design-visualization/qampa-pushing-visual-limits-3d-5693

 

My work of Forza Motorsport 6 was as the Art Research and Development Lead. The responsibilities were for helping develop new systems and workflows that would speed up production and improve visual quality. One of my tasks was as the only artist on a strike team to develop a wet system for the game. We came up with a solution that would draw off exisiting physical material properties that we had already set on materials in order to make objects look wet - along with custom authored wetness maps for key assets. The result was the ability to make a track look wet in a very short period of time, instead of hand crafting wet on every asset. A lot of my work revolved around the process for the road and neighboring objects:

 

Still very work in progress! I saw this great old (but new) Ural motorcycle driving down the road one day, so followed it to where the owner worked. Turned out he worked at Ural motorcycles itself, and they were based just down the street! A modelling project first and foremost - looking at intergrating CAD packages in to game and film art - digging up my old skills as an industrial designer! A mix of Maya, Rhino3d and ZBrush:

Working at Turn 10 (A Microsoft Studio) as a Track Lead, I was responsible for leading a team of artists and a group of outsourcers to create high profile race tracks in the award winning game XBOX One release title - Forza Motorsport 5. One such track was the Yas Marina circuit in Abu Dhabi. My work consisted of managing and mentoring my team, whilst modeling, texturing, UVing and sculpting assets for the track, designing materials and prototyping new workflows and systems for asset creation and performance work. I centered my 3D work around the "Viceroy Hotel" - the modern curved glass building (designed, apparently, after the shape of a whale if seen from above) that is the centerpoint of the track.

 

Myself and my team of 2 artists were responsible for adding final polish to the top gear circuit, along with performance optimisations. By the time we were complete, every asset had recieved visual and performance polish. Outside of running my team, I was responsible for creating the concrete barriers and tire walls and performance work.

Below are a couple of videos of two of the barriers I created for Forza. Each one started as a high res ZBrush sculpt, baked to a low resolution mesh. Texturing completed in photoshop. Diffuse/Normal/Roughness/Metallic maps were authored by myself:

 

 

 

Myself and my team of 2 artists were responsible for adding final polish to the Indianapolis speedway track, along with performance optimisations. By the time we were complete, every asset had recieved visual and performance polish. Outside of running my team, I was responsible for texture visual polish and performance work.

 

 

The above two shots are from Half Life 2 Episode 2. We needed a helicopter for the final sequence where Gordon and Alyx escape. I modelled this after an old Russian MI-8 helicopter. We wanted the design to be used, but still obviously flyable and not totally hacked together. The top shot is the high-res model, the bottom shot is the low res game asset (with normal map and phong specular mask). Research, design, modeling and texturing was all completed by myself. Textures include color, normal map and specular mask. Interior was also fully modelled, but never finally needed in the game.

 

For the latest incarnation of Counter Strike we needed an incendiary grenade model. The grenade had to stand out against a similar design of smoke grenade. I chose a very graphic approach to the texture of the main body, in contrast to the dirty and lightly used head and mechanism. Model and textures are done by myself. Diffuse, specular and specular exponent textures were made.

A terrorist bomb. The team decided that we needed a bomb that didn't look professional, but still deadly and obviously a bomb. Researched, designed, modeled and textured by myself. Diffuse, specular and specular exponent textures were made.

The counter terrorist knife. We wanted a simple knife, that didn't look evil, yet was still obviously rather good at inflicting injury. Researched, designed, modeled and textured by myself. Diffuse, specular and specular exponent textures were made. Bottom shot is in game.

The main rifle of the counter terrorists - the M4A1. High and low res models completed by myself. Texture pass done by another artist. Model is based of both an airsoft version of the gun and photographic reference (mainly for the iron sights). Bottom shot is in game.

USP pistol for the game. Researched, designed, modeled and textured by myself. Diffuse, specular and specular exponent textures were made.

As part of my work at Valve I have been involved with internal development projects. The two shots shown above were tests done to up-res an existing map from a previous game (in this case Left4Dead 2). As a team we collaboratively chose this mansion facade, since it is rich in architectural detail. I was responsible for modeling and texturing the destroyed corner, ground floor doors, the columns, the two smaller roof windows, the corbels and roof trim and the railings alongside the curved steps leading up to the entrance.

 

A view model chainsaw for chopping zombies. We decided the game needed a chainsaw, so this is what I came up with. We wanted a classic chainsaw, metal body, very rugged and hardy. I started looking through reference and based this off a 1970s small lumberjack saw. Model and UVs were done by myself, texture by another artist.

OK, sure it is a while ago, but come on - it's Hogwarts! :) I was responsible for modelling over 40 sets and locations for both Harry Potter 1 & 2, some high resolution, some previs. The work was based off both photographs and long range laser scan data. Above is a model I created based off the "miniature" of hogwarts, that took up an aircraft hangar.

Above is a shot of the model I did of the enchanted ceiling of the Hogwarts Great Hall - based off a miniture physical model.

Easily one of my favorite film projects to work on. My team was responsible for accurately making the 3D versions of the two main ships in the Master and Commander film. This one was based off the USS Constitution in Boston, MA. I was responsible for the main hull, rudder, ships head, life boats, some deck details. Rigging, cannons, masts and other deck details by another artist.